HOW TO FIND PERFECT CO-FOUNDER - COFOUNDER PHASE- STARTUP PROCESS

How to Find the Perfect Co-Founder? | The Startup Process

How to Find the Perfect Co-Founder? | The Startup Process
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Now that you have pondered over why you need a co-founder for your company and decided that you want one instead of going solo, you would want to figure out how to find the right person for this job. Finding the perfect co-founder is one of the most critical tasks you would have as it can make or break the company in the future. You would want someone who is not only committed but also shares your vision and passion for the company.

How to Find the Perfect Co-Founder for Your Startup?

A co-founder needs to be good at everything that you are not. So let’s delve into how you can find the perfect co-founder for your startup.

Analyze Yourself and Spend time on Crafting the Precise Job Description

The first step should be to analyze your strengths and weaknesses and figure out what is exactly missing in your skillset. For example, if you do not know programming, you can always learn it in a few months. It does not make sense to get a co-founder and share equity for skills that can be easily learned. Instead, focus on on your inherent personality and then decide what traits should a co-founder have to complement these.

A start-up founding team needs every skill and trait to be successful and to see the big picture. Some are good with planning and strategy, some with implementation. Some are good in deep introspection, some in networking. Some people are creative, some are analytical. Craft a job description that is very carefully thought out so that even when you network in various events or advertise on job portals for finding the right partner for your business, you know exactly what kind of a person you want and the applicant or prospect also knows  what to expect from the position and if he is the right candidate for the role.

Network, Network, and Network Some More

Start-ups need you to network a lot for almost everything. Finding a co-founder is no different. Attend industry conferences and entrepreneur forums, join online entrepreneur groups on Linkedin and business partner matchmaking sites (like CoFoundersLab, TechCoFounder, Startup Weekend), and visit local university entrepreneur fairs to talk to different people who have similar interests. There are tons of places to find entrepreneurs like you who could be your co-founder. You just need to look.


Look for Different Backgrounds and Skills

While the vision for the company should be shared by your co-founder(s), it is wise to get someone from a different background or culture and skills than your own. It widens the perspective and brings in fresh ideas.

Talk to Mentors and Advisors

Leverage your professional network and ask your mentors for advice on finding the right co-founder. Many people think it is awkward to bother your mentors for every little issue but most start-up mentors would love to extend a helping hand, especially in such an important task. Trust is the most important factor in finding a co-founder and if you can get someone you trust in your own network, then there’s nothing better. Your mentors have been in the start-up scene far longer than you have and hence would know far more people who could be the right fit for the role.

Focus Less on Data and More on Chemistry

When scouting for a co-founder, it seems obvious that cold hard facts should dictate your choice but at the end of the day, we are all people. The interests might match and the skills might compliment but there might be absolutely zero chemistry or trust. You want a co-founder for the long term and it is a must that you should enjoy each other’s company and trust each other with company decisions. It is tough coming to work every day if you hate your co-founder’s guts. So work together for some time once you think you have found a good candidate and give him time to flourish and prove his worth. See how well you bond and if the work is progressing faster and more smoothly with him around. You should be absolutely sure before you sign away any equity.

Negotiate Terms and Equity Early

There is no formula for how much equity you should give away to your co-founder but having an honest and frank discussion on equity at the earliest is always better. You should be upfront about this if you want to avoid any problem in the future. You should make your expectations clear to the co-founder that it is a long-term commitment and hence the equity too would be vested likewise. It is also important to be clear of all the power dynamics. While co-founders have almost equal powers, when it comes to final decisions, there can be only person at the top as there is only one CEO for every company. So all the terms related to responsibilities and powers should be clearly laid out.

Finding the perfect co-founder is as difficult as finding the right life-partner. They can be your greatest asset or your biggest liability. After all, many companies last longer than marriages. And like marriages, they might not always work the first time around but eventually, with efforts, you can find the right co-founder. It remains one of the most important activities for a new company and should involve a lot of thought and introspection. When you find the right person, even if the start-up fails, the team sticks and you can move on to start another company and then another. Great teams are the sure-shot formula for success. But building one needs lots of effort and perseverance. Nobody said it would be easy, right?




The Startup Process

We know how important your dream business is to you. Therefore, we’ve come up with an all in one guide: The Startup Process to help you turn your vision into reality.

Now that you know How to Find the Perfect Co-Founder, let us now move on to The Prototype Phase.



Written by

Product Guy. Introverted Marketer. Engineer by education. Movie and TV Geek by nature. Can be seen reading comics and non-fiction books when not binging on movies and Netflix shows. Pop-culture junkie. Out and out foodie. Wee bit self-obsessed."

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